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How well do children with speech, language and communication needs do with phonics?

How well do children with speech, language and communication needs do with phonics?

The government have recently published results from the 2016 phonics screening, the test that is done with every child in year one to find out how well they are using the phonics skills they’ve learned. Phonics is one of the skills that children need for learning to read and is strongly linked with speech and language processing. There is a particular focus on teaching phonics in the early stages of school.

The results show that:

• 86% of children with no special educational needs achieved the expected standard in phonics

• But, only 46% of children with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) achieved the expected standard

This confirms what we know; many children with SLCN find phonics difficult and it can affect how well they learn to read.

You can read the report about the findings of the phonics screen here.

The Communication Trust have a guide to support teachers delivering and interpreting the phonics screening check to children with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). You can find out more about ‘Communicating Phonics’ here.